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Accolades, November 2021

Accolades News for Researchers

Posted December 3, 2021 by Tiffany Lee

Awards, Honors and Recognitions

Dawn O. Braithwaite, communication studies, recently had a National Communication Association book award named after her. The award, now called the Dawn O. Braithwaite Distinguished Book Award, is housed in the NCA’s Family Communication Division and honors individuals who make a significant contribution to scholarship in family communication theory. Braithwaite was honored for her contributions to, support of and advocacy for family communication and its scholars. She is an author of the influential family communication theories book “Engaging Theories in Family Communication,” as well as the first undergraduate family communication textbook, “Family Communication: Cohesion and Change.” Officers in the NCA Division of Family Communication noted Braithwaite’s role in creating space for different approaches to studying family communication and her support for qualitative research in a quantitative landscape. Braithwaite is a distinguished scholar and past president of the association.

Jeffrey Day, architecture, received an Unbuilt Architecture Honorable Mention Award from the American Institute of Architects Nebraska. Day was recognized for “Basketball Training Center,” a sports training facility for under-resourced communities in Omaha’s north downtown area. Day said the work-in-progress is aimed at elevating athletes in the simple, natural environment of an all-wood building.

Brian Harbourne, mathematics, was named a fellow of the American Mathematical Society for contributions to algebraic geometry and commutative algebra, and for mathematical exposition. Fellows are selected for outstanding contributions to the creation, exposition, advancement, communication and utilization of mathematics. Harbourne was one of 45 mathematical scientists from across the world who were honored this year.

Emira Ibrahimpasic, School of Global Integrative Studies, and Katie Kunzman, coordinator of the university’s Education Abroad program, received the 2021 Award for Excellence in Education Abroad Curriculum Design from The Forum on Education Abroad. The award honors faculty who develop and implement innovative education abroad curricula, and is the field’s only award honoring excellence in the design of an education abroad course. Ibrahimpasic and Kunzman were honored for “Negotiating Peace: From Conflict to Coexistence,” a summer course that enabled Husker students to explore conflict resolution case studies from two countries in different stages of the process – Ireland and Syria.

David Karle, architecture, received the 2021 Architectural | Design Education Award from the American Institute of Architects Nebraska. The award recognizes individuals who have rendered distinguished service to the profession of architecture design or to the arts science in a Nebraska institution of higher learning. Karle was recognized for his focus on student success and his excellence in the scholarship of teaching and learning. Dean Katherine Ankerson noted his efforts to push the boundaries of the college’s curriculum and elevate the standing of Husker students on the world stage.

Anthony Schutz, law, received the Distinguished Service Award from the American Agricultural Law Association. The annual award recognizes an AALA member, selected by the association’s three most recent recipients, for contributions to the organization and to agricultural law.

Brett Stohs, law, and the Weibling Entrepreneurship Clinic at the University of Nebraska Law College received the annual Distinguished Hall of Fame Award from NETForce, a collaboration focused on building Nebraska’s entrepreneurial ecosystem. Stohs and the clinic were honored for serving as a resource for entrepreneurs, educators and community builders and providing free advice and legal representation to startup businesses in Nebraska at no charge. They were recognized at the Nebraska Entrepreneurship Best Practices Summit in York, Nebraska, on Nov. 9.

Jessica Fargen Walsh, journalism and mass communications, was selected to participate in the Faculty Success Program of the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity. The 12-week online program, set for spring 2022, teaches tenure-track and tenured faculty the skills to increase research and writing productivity while maintaining a healthy work-life balance.

The Center on Children, Families and the Law received the 2021 Quality Program Award from the National Staff Development and Training Association. The award recognizes the development and implementation of cutting-edge training programs and variations on traditional practices. CCFL was recognized for its “helping the helpers” systems, which are based on multidisciplinary research and evidence-based strategies. CCFL provides a diverse array of technical assistance and consultation activities to human service agencies, with the goal of achieving positive outcomes for children and families. The center received the award Oct. 5 during the 2021 Annual Education Conference.

Animation Career Review rated the University of Nebraska-Lincoln as No. 25 among public institutions on its 2021 list of Virtual/Augmented Reality College Rankings. Ranking is based on academic reputation, admission selectivity and the value of an institution’s offerings relative to its tuition.

Publications

Jonis Agee, English, is author of “The Bones of Paradise: A Novel,” which was selected as the 2022 One Book One Nebraska selection. The One Book One Nebraska reading program, sponsored by the Nebraska Center for the Book, encourages Nebraskans to read and discuss a single book that is written by a Nebraska author or that has a Nebraska theme or setting. Agee’s novel is a multigenerational family saga set in the Nebraska Sandhills in the years following the massacre at Wounded Knee.

Dawn O. Braithwaite, communication studies, and Paul Schrodt, a communication studies professor at Texas Christian University who earned his doctorate from Nebraska in 2003, are editors of the third edition of “Engaging Theories in Interpersonal Communication.” The book, published by Routledge on Oct. 28, is a key resource for advanced undergraduate and graduate students studying the foundational and emerging theories in the field of interpersonal communication.

Joy Castro, English, is author of the new novel “Flight Risk,” which was published by Lake Union Press in November. The novel tells the story of Isabel Morales, an artist living in Chicago who harbors secrets from her past lives in West Virginia and New York University. She’s forced to confront her past when her mother dies in prison in Appalachia.

John Guretzky, Martha Mamo, Walter H. Schacht, Jerry D. Volesky and Ana B. Wingeyer, agronomy and horticulture, received the Outstanding Paper Award from the Crop, Forage and Turfgrass Management Journal. They were recognized for their paper “Mob Grazing Increases Trampling but Not Litter Deposition on a Nebraska Sandhills Subirrigated Meadow.”

Alice Kang, political science, is an author of “Reimagining the Judiciary: Women’s Representation on High Courts Worldwide,” which was recently published by Oxford University Press. The book presents a theoretical framework for explaining women’s representation on high courts over time and includes five country case studies. It is the culmination of a National Science Foundation-funded project.

Rachael Shah, English, received the Outstanding Book in Community Writing award from the Coalition for Community Writing. The award recognizes the most outstanding book in community writing, which includes the areas of service learning, community-based research, community literacy, ethnography and memoir, community publishing, advocacy, and activist writing. Shah was recognized for her book “Rewriting Partnerships: Community Perspectives on Community-Based Learning,” which discusses how to take seriously the experiences and knowledge of the communities that partner with universities.

Chungwook Sim and Maher Tadros (emeritus), along with former Nebraska graduate assistants David Gee and Micheal Assad, received the George D. Nasser Award from the Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute. The team was honored for its paper, “Flexural Design of Precast, Prestressed Ultra-High-Performance Concrete Members.” The award recognizes papers published in the PCI Journal relating to the design, research, production or construction of precast concrete structures from authors who are 40 years of age or younger.

Laurie Thomas Lee, journalism and mass communications, is an author on the third edition of the textbook “Communication Law: Practical Applications in the Digital Age.” The book, a core resource for undergraduates studying communication and mass media law, was published Nov. 29 by Routledge and includes expanded coverage of digital media law and social media.

Joe Weber, journalism and mass communications, recently launched his book “Rhymes with Fighter: Clayton Yeutter, American Statesman” with the University of Nebraska Press. The biography tells the life story of Clayton Yeutter, a Nebraska native whose work in agriculture, economics and international trade made global impacts.

Other News

Bob Wilhelm, vice chancellor for research and economic development, started a term as interim executive vice chancellor on Nov. 20. Wilhelm replaces Elizabeth Spiller, who recently resigned. In this interim role, Wilhelm will serve as Nebraska’s chief academic officer, leading and directing the university’s academic enterprise. Wilhelm is not a candidate for the permanent executive vice chancellor position and continues to lead the university’s research and economic development office.

Research News Accolades Submission Form

Accolades are compiled from faculty and staff nominations, weekly Achievement columns published by University Communication, and college, center and departmental websites. To submit yours or a colleague's, complete the form below.

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